B-Ring It On!

 

Saturn_s_B-ring_close-up

What do you think this picture might be? Could it be a microscope’s view of a hair? Could it be the pages of a really big book? They’re not bad guesses but they’re not correct.

This image focuses on a region in Saturn’s B ring, which is seen in twice as much detail as ever before, revealing a wealth of rich structure. It shows the incredible detail at which the international Cassini spacecraft is observing Saturn’s rings of icy debris as part of its dedicated close ‘ring grazing’ orbits. The spacecraft was at a distance of about 51 000 km from the rings

Saturn’s rings are composed mainly of water ice and range from tiny dust-size specks to boulders tens of metres across. Some of the patterns seen in Cassini’s close images of the rings are generated by gravitational interactions with Saturn’s many moons, these are known as shepherd moons which by their gravity help to keep the rings in shape by ‘kicking’ material into the rings or out into space. However many details remain unexplained.

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A Cassini image looking across Saturn’s rings showing where the B-ring lies.

The spacecraft’s ring-grazing orbits began last November, and will continue until late April, when the mission enters its ‘grand finale’ phase. During 22 final orbits Cassini will repeatedly dive through the gap between the rings and Saturn before plunging into the planet’s atmosphere in mid-September to conclude its incredible 13-year odyssey around the Saturn system.

If you want to see Saturn and its rings this is a good time to do it; Saturn rises about 2:15 in the morning in mid-March and an hour earlier by mid-April and lies in the constellation Sagittarius. That means for us that it is quite low in the sky. It gets to its highest point in the sky a little before sunrise, so you have a good chance of seeing it. (Sagittarius is a lovely constellation full of objects as when you look at it you are looking in the direction of the centre of our galaxy the Milky Way.)

You will need to look towards the East and South to see it but it will be the brightest object in that part of the sky.

To help you find it the moon will be either side of Saturn on the 16th and 17th of April.

Binoculars will show that it has a funny shape, almost like a rugby ball, and a small telescope will begin to show the rings. The rings are currently tilted towards us and will make for a lovely sight.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a joint venture between NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian space agency ASI. It was launched from Cape Canaveral on the 15th. October 1997 aboard a Titan IV-B which is the NASA’s largest and most powerful rocket.

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Published in: on March 26, 2017 at 12:14  Leave a Comment  
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